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A prayer written by Madame Elisabeth; the prayer, which she included in a letter to Mme. de Raigecourt, was written in 1788-1789.

"Adorable heart of Jesus, sanctuary of the love that led God to make himself man, to sacrifice his life for our salvation, and to make of his body the food of our souls: in gratitude for that infinite charity I give you my heart, and with it all that I possess in this world, all that I am, all that I shall do, all that I shall suffer.
But, my God, may this heart, I implore you, be no longer unworthy of you; make it like unto yourself; surround it with your thorns and close its entrance to all ill-regulated affections; set there your cross, make it feel its worth, make it willing to love it.
Kindle it with your divine flame. May it burn for your glory; may it be all yours, when you have done what you will with it. You are its consolation in its troubles, the remedy of its ills, its strength and refuge in temptation, its hope during life, its haven in death.
I ask you, O heart so loving, the same favour for my companions. So be it. … O divine heart of Jesus! I love you, I adore you, I invoke you, with my companions, for all the days of my life, but especially for the hour of my death.”

[image: Madame Elisabeth in the Temple Prison, my scan/collection]

A prayer written by Madame Elisabeth; the prayer, which she included in a letter to Mme. de Raigecourt, was written in 1788-1789.

"Adorable heart of Jesus, sanctuary of the love that led God to make himself man, to sacrifice his life for our salvation, and to make of his body the food of our souls: in gratitude for that infinite charity I give you my heart, and with it all that I possess in this world, all that I am, all that I shall do, all that I shall suffer.

But, my God, may this heart, I implore you, be no longer unworthy of you; make it like unto yourself; surround it with your thorns and close its entrance to all ill-regulated affections; set there your cross, make it feel its worth, make it willing to love it.

Kindle it with your divine flame. May it burn for your glory; may it be all yours, when you have done what you will with it. You are its consolation in its troubles, the remedy of its ills, its strength and refuge in temptation, its hope during life, its haven in death.

I ask you, O heart so loving, the same favour for my companions. So be it. … O divine heart of Jesus! I love you, I adore you, I invoke you, with my companions, for all the days of my life, but especially for the hour of my death.”

[image: Madame Elisabeth in the Temple Prison, my scan/collection]

Filed under madame elisabeth 18th century religion quotes prayers

79 notes


In the understandable grief that overwhelms me, which I share with all of the realm, I nevertheless have duties I must fulfill. I am the king and this one word covers a great many obligations, but I am only twenty* years old. I do not think that I have acquired all the knowledge necessary for my position.

—an excerpt from a letter from Louis XVI to Maurepas, written shortly after the death of Louis XV, in which the new king asked Maurepas to return as a minister.
[translation: Alison Johnson, Louis XVI and the French Revolution]
*Louis XVI was still 19 when he became king, his 20th birthday came the following August

In the understandable grief that overwhelms me, which I share with all of the realm, I nevertheless have duties I must fulfill. I am the king and this one word covers a great many obligations, but I am only twenty* years old. I do not think that I have acquired all the knowledge necessary for my position.

—an excerpt from a letter from Louis XVI to Maurepas, written shortly after the death of Louis XV, in which the new king asked Maurepas to return as a minister.

[translation: Alison Johnson, Louis XVI and the French Revolution]

*Louis XVI was still 19 when he became king, his 20th birthday came the following August

Filed under louis xvi french history 18th century letters quotes