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A pair of 18th century 'urne mysteriuse' miniatures, likely made in England during the French Revolution.
The miniature on the left represents the English government, and depicts the silhouettes of George III and Queen Charlotte against a decorative vase topped by an English crown and surrounded by English oak leaves.
The miniature on the right represents France, and depicts the silhouettes of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette against a hydra monster which has broken symbols of the French monarchy.
[source: Liveauctioneers]

A pair of 18th century 'urne mysteriuse' miniatures, likely made in England during the French Revolution.

The miniature on the left represents the English government, and depicts the silhouettes of George III and Queen Charlotte against a decorative vase topped by an English crown and surrounded by English oak leaves.

The miniature on the right represents France, and depicts the silhouettes of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette against a hydra monster which has broken symbols of the French monarchy.

[source: Liveauctioneers]

Filed under 18th century french revolution french history marie antoinette louis xvi art

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A quick and horrific scene unfolded before my eyes. On seeing the bodies lying on the ground, the Princess made a gesture of horror and stepped back sharply. The two men who stood beside her seized her by the arms and spoke to her; she replied, with gestures, but I could not hear her words.
Some of the executioners approached the small group and laughed, probably mocking the fear of the princesse. One of them threatened her with his pike. She stepped back and raised her arms, as if to protect herself. The executioners had parted and I thought they were going to pass.
I breathed when, suddenly, two of those devils stood before her and beat her, one with a pike, the other with a sword. She screamed, staggered, put a hand on her chest, then fell onto a pile of bodies … she tried to get up, but she received fresh blows, her arms fluttered a moment, then did not move again.

—An account of the murder of the princesse de Lamballe during the September Massacres; witnessed by Jean Némery, quoted in La Princesse de Lamballe by Michel de Decker.

A quick and horrific scene unfolded before my eyes. On seeing the bodies lying on the ground, the Princess made a gesture of horror and stepped back sharply. The two men who stood beside her seized her by the arms and spoke to her; she replied, with gestures, but I could not hear her words.

Some of the executioners approached the small group and laughed, probably mocking the fear of the princesse. One of them threatened her with his pike. She stepped back and raised her arms, as if to protect herself. The executioners had parted and I thought they were going to pass.

I breathed when, suddenly, two of those devils stood before her and beat her, one with a pike, the other with a sword. She screamed, staggered, put a hand on her chest, then fell onto a pile of bodies … she tried to get up, but she received fresh blows, her arms fluttered a moment, then did not move again.

—An account of the murder of the princesse de Lamballe during the September Massacres; witnessed by Jean Némery, quoted in La Princesse de Lamballe by Michel de Decker.

Filed under princesse de lamballe french history 18th century french revolution quotes

182 notes

Marie Thérèse Louise Savoie, the princesse de Lamballe, was murdered on September 3rd, 1792 during the violence of the September Massacres.
She was brought before a temporary tribunal, where she was asked to swear an oath to liberty and equality and to swear against Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. It is believed that she refused to swear the oath against the king and queen, as it was “not in her heart.” She was condemned, then released outside to a waiting crowd, were she was murdered.
The head of the princesse was then cut off and paraded on a pike outside the Temple Tower, in the hopes of forcing the imprisoned Marie Antoinette to look upon the decapitated head of her friend and favorite.

Marie Thérèse Louise Savoie, the princesse de Lamballe, was murdered on September 3rd, 1792 during the violence of the September Massacres.

She was brought before a temporary tribunal, where she was asked to swear an oath to liberty and equality and to swear against Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. It is believed that she refused to swear the oath against the king and queen, as it was “not in her heart.” She was condemned, then released outside to a waiting crowd, were she was murdered.

The head of the princesse was then cut off and paraded on a pike outside the Temple Tower, in the hopes of forcing the imprisoned Marie Antoinette to look upon the decapitated head of her friend and favorite.

Filed under princesse de lamballe marie antoinette 18th century french history french revolution