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Posts tagged french family

14 notes

Marie-Thérèse de Savoie, comtesse d’Artois in 1775 by Jean-Baptiste Gautier d’Agoty
Today’s theme, to match one of last weeks theme, is portraits of Marie-Thérèse de Savoie, the comtesse d’Artois! 
The comtesse d’Artois (31 January 1756 – 2 June 1805) fled France along with her husband after the fall of the Bastille, and died in exile while staying in Austria.

Marie-Thérèse de Savoie, comtesse d’Artois in 1775 by Jean-Baptiste Gautier d’Agoty

Today’s theme, to match one of last weeks theme, is portraits of Marie-Thérèse de Savoie, the comtesse d’Artois!

The comtesse d’Artois (31 January 1756 – 2 June 1805) fled France along with her husband after the fall of the Bastille, and died in exile while staying in Austria.


Filed under marie antoinette french family art 18th century paintings comtesse de artois

19 notes

May God not abandon us wholly; it is to that we must limit our hopes. I have no taste for martyrdom; but I feel that I should be very glad to have the certainty of suffering it rather than abandon one iota of my faith. I hope that if I am destined to it, God will give me strength.
-Madame Elisabeth to the Marquise de Bombelles, December 30, 1790

May God not abandon us wholly; it is to that we must limit our hopes. I have no taste for martyrdom; but I feel that I should be very glad to have the certainty of suffering it rather than abandon one iota of my faith. I hope that if I am destined to it, God will give me strength.

-Madame Elisabeth to the Marquise de Bombelles, December 30, 1790

Filed under french family madame elisabeth quotes letters french revolution

48 notes

The last moments of Madame Elisabeth, from the Life and Letters of Madame Elisabeth de France:
[The cart arrived at the scaffold, and Madame Élisabeth] was the first to descend; the executioner  offered his hand, but the princess looked the other way and needed no  help. At the foot of the scaffold was a long bench on which the victims were told to sit.  By a refinement of cruelty Madame Élisabeth  was placed nearest the steps to the scaffold, but she was the last of  the twenty-five called to ascend them; she was to see and hear the  killing of them all before her turn should come. During that time she  never ceased to say the De profundis; she who was about to die prayed for the dead.
The first to be called was Mme. de Crussol. She rose immediately; as  she passed Madame Élisabeth she curtsied, and then, bending forward,  asked to be allowed to kiss her. “Willingly, and with all my heart,”  replied the princess. All the other women, ten in number, did likewise.   The men, as they passed her, each bowed low the head that an instant  later was to fall into the basket.  When the twenty-fourth bowed thus  before her, she said: “Courage, and faith in God’s mercy.”
Then she  rose herself, to be ready at the call of the executioner.  She mounted  firmly the steps of the scaffold.  Again the man offered his hand, but  withdrew it, seeing from her bearing that she needed no help.  With an  upward look to heaven, she gave herself into the hands of the  executioner. As he fastened her to the fatal plank, her neckerchief came  loose and fell to the ground.
"In the name of your mother, monsieur,  cover me," she said.  Those were her last words.

The last moments of Madame Elisabeth, from the Life and Letters of Madame Elisabeth de France:

[The cart arrived at the scaffold, and Madame Élisabeth] was the first to descend; the executioner offered his hand, but the princess looked the other way and needed no help. At the foot of the scaffold was a long bench on which the victims were told to sit. By a refinement of cruelty Madame Élisabeth was placed nearest the steps to the scaffold, but she was the last of the twenty-five called to ascend them; she was to see and hear the killing of them all before her turn should come. During that time she never ceased to say the De profundis; she who was about to die prayed for the dead.

The first to be called was Mme. de Crussol. She rose immediately; as she passed Madame Élisabeth she curtsied, and then, bending forward, asked to be allowed to kiss her. “Willingly, and with all my heart,” replied the princess. All the other women, ten in number, did likewise. The men, as they passed her, each bowed low the head that an instant later was to fall into the basket. When the twenty-fourth bowed thus before her, she said: “Courage, and faith in God’s mercy.”

Then she rose herself, to be ready at the call of the executioner. She mounted firmly the steps of the scaffold. Again the man offered his hand, but withdrew it, seeing from her bearing that she needed no help. With an upward look to heaven, she gave herself into the hands of the executioner. As he fastened her to the fatal plank, her neckerchief came loose and fell to the ground.

"In the name of your mother, monsieur, cover me," she said. Those were her last words.

Filed under madame elisabeth marie antoinette french family french revolution last words quotes history 18th century

28 notes

On May 10th, 1794, Élisabeth of France, known as Madame Élisabeth, was guillotined.
At her trial she reportedly said, after her brother was referred to as “the tyrant”: "If my brother had been what you call him, you would not have been where you are, nor I where I am".
This year there are several excellent posts about this unfortunate princess. Tea at Trianon remarks on Elisabeth’s devotion and loyalty to her family, Madame Guillotine has a compilation post about her life, and Leah Marie Brown has complied a post of interesting facts about Madame Elisabeth.

On May 10th, 1794, Élisabeth of France, known as Madame Élisabeth, was guillotined.

At her trial she reportedly said, after her brother was referred to as “the tyrant”: "If my brother had been what you call him, you would not have been where you are, nor I where I am".

This year there are several excellent posts about this unfortunate princess. Tea at Trianon remarks on Elisabeth’s devotion and loyalty to her family, Madame Guillotine has a compilation post about her life, and Leah Marie Brown has complied a post of interesting facts about Madame Elisabeth.

Filed under marie antoinette family french family madame elisabeth french revolution history 18th century

76 notes

Detail of the statue. The inscription: “La reine, c’est moi.” (I am the queen.)
When confronted by a mob intent on harming the queen, Madame Elisabeth seized upon their confusion about her identity - they thought she was Marie Antoinette - and told them she was indeed the queen.

Detail of the statue. The inscription: “La reine, c’est moi.” (I am the queen.)

When confronted by a mob intent on harming the queen, Madame Elisabeth seized upon their confusion about her identity - they thought she was Marie Antoinette - and told them she was indeed the queen.

Filed under madame elisabeth marie antoinette statues french family