treasure for your pleasure

a marie antoinette blog

Posts tagged quotes

52 notes


[Despite the influence Mme la Dauphine has on him, M. le Dauphin] has still not altered his extraordinary taste for all building work, such as masonry, carpentry, and others of the kind … He works himself with the laborers, moves the materials, beams, and paving stones[,]

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 17 July 1773
[translation: Olivier Bernier, Secrets of Marie Antoinette]

[Despite the influence Mme la Dauphine has on him, M. le Dauphin] has still not altered his extraordinary taste for all building work, such as masonry, carpentry, and others of the kind … He works himself with the laborers, moves the materials, beams, and paving stones[,]

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 17 July 1773

[translation: Olivier Bernier, Secrets of Marie Antoinette]

Filed under louis xvi marie antoinette french history 18th century maria theresa quotes letters

52 notes

The queen is very kind to me just now; we are going together to Saint-Cyr, which she calls my cradle. She calls Montreuil my little Trianon. I have been to hers the last few days with her, without any consequences, and there was no attention she did not show me. She prepared for me one of those surprises in which she excels; but what we did most was to weep over the death of my poor little niece [Sophie].

—Madame Elisabeth to the marquise de Bombelles, 25 June 1787

Filed under marie antoinette madame elisabeth french history 18th century letters quotes

67 notes


I keep preciously the book you sent me, for everything that comes from you will always be very dear to me; you must be sure of that if you know the lively and respectful love that your very obedient daughter will have for you her whole life.

—Marie Antoinette to Maria Theresa, 16 April 1771
[translation: Olivier Bernier, Secrets of Marie Antoinette]

I keep preciously the book you sent me, for everything that comes from you will always be very dear to me; you must be sure of that if you know the lively and respectful love that your very obedient daughter will have for you her whole life.

—Marie Antoinette to Maria Theresa, 16 April 1771

[translation: Olivier Bernier, Secrets of Marie Antoinette]

Filed under marie antoinette maria theresa 18th century french history quotes letters

53 notes


Mme la dauphine still enjoys riding, and a fortnight ago a slight accident occurred, which I heard about despite the precautions taken to conceal the matter from me. [The dauphine] was riding, when an equerry’s horse reared, striking Mme la dauphine’s foot, although she did not show any pain. She continued to ride and when she returned her foot was swollen.
When her ladies said that she should immediately have said she was in pain, H.R.H. replied that she had concealed her pain in order to spare the equerry any upset. … This kindness made an impression on all, and it illuminates perfectly Mme la dauphine’s character.

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 22 May 1771
[translation: Margaret Anne Macleod, There Were Three of Us in the Relationship: The Secret Letters of Marie Antoinette]

Mme la dauphine still enjoys riding, and a fortnight ago a slight accident occurred, which I heard about despite the precautions taken to conceal the matter from me. [The dauphine] was riding, when an equerry’s horse reared, striking Mme la dauphine’s foot, although she did not show any pain. She continued to ride and when she returned her foot was swollen.

When her ladies said that she should immediately have said she was in pain, H.R.H. replied that she had concealed her pain in order to spare the equerry any upset. … This kindness made an impression on all, and it illuminates perfectly Mme la dauphine’s character.

—Ambassador Mercy to Maria Theresa, 22 May 1771

[translation: Margaret Anne Macleod, There Were Three of Us in the Relationship: The Secret Letters of Marie Antoinette]

Filed under marie antoinette french history 18th century letters quotes

59 notes


The morning of that terrible day [of the king’s death] we rose at six o’clock. The evening before my mother had scarcely strength enough to undress my brother and put him to bed; she then threw herself, dressed as she was, upon her bed, and we heard her through the night trembling with cold and sorrow. At a quarter past six they opened our door to look for a prayer-book for my father’s mass; we thought we were to go to him, and we still had that hope until the cries of joy of a frenzied populace came to inform us that the crime was consummated.

—the memoirs of the duchesse d’Angouleme
[image credit: New York Public Library Digital Collections]

The morning of that terrible day [of the king’s death] we rose at six o’clock. The evening before my mother had scarcely strength enough to undress my brother and put him to bed; she then threw herself, dressed as she was, upon her bed, and we heard her through the night trembling with cold and sorrow. At a quarter past six they opened our door to look for a prayer-book for my father’s mass; we thought we were to go to him, and we still had that hope until the cries of joy of a frenzied populace came to inform us that the crime was consummated.

—the memoirs of the duchesse d’Angouleme

[image credit: New York Public Library Digital Collections]

Filed under louis xvi marie antoinette french revolution 18th century marie therese charlotte louis charles madame elisabeth quotes

115 notes


The Queen’s toilette was likewise a never-failing subject for [criticism from her brother.] He blamed her for having introduced too many new fashions; and teased her about her use of rouge.
One day, while she was laying on more of it than usual, before going to the play, he pointed out a lady who was in the room, and who was, in truth, highly painted. “A little more under the eyes,” said the Emperor to the Queen; “lay on the rouge like a fury, as that lady does.”
The Queen entreated her brother to refrain from his jokes, or at all events to address them, when they were so outspoken, to her alone.

—the memoirs of Madame Campan

The Queen’s toilette was likewise a never-failing subject for [criticism from her brother.] He blamed her for having introduced too many new fashions; and teased her about her use of rouge.

One day, while she was laying on more of it than usual, before going to the play, he pointed out a lady who was in the room, and who was, in truth, highly painted. “A little more under the eyes,” said the Emperor to the Queen; “lay on the rouge like a fury, as that lady does.”

The Queen entreated her brother to refrain from his jokes, or at all events to address them, when they were so outspoken, to her alone.

—the memoirs of Madame Campan

Filed under marie antoinette french history joseph II quotes